Industrial lighting

There is a current trend for creating Industrial style lighting schemes which seems very popular at the moment. Bars, restaurants and residential spaces tend to be re-visiting the vintage look through the use of original, salvaged lamps and fittings teamed with quirky bulbs, flexes or installations to bring them bang up to date.

Stunning original vintage lights can be sourced readily at antique and vintage fairs, in salvage yards, on ebay and through antiques dealers. Large factory pendants, Storm lights, Caged, hanging loft and garage lamps, fishermen’s lamps etc. are proving to be very popular in a bid to create an industrial aesthetic. In addition there are a large number of lighting designers and manufacturers producing vintage inspired pieces. Look out for slightly rusting or patinated metals, solid iron, stainless steel, copper, bronze and chrome and team these with modern flex and cables to give them a modern twist. to create a  real ‘wow’ factor, a collection of different vintage lights look stunning when arranged in a linear formation above a table or perhaps hung at different heights in a cluster above an island or a bar.

Please have a look at some of my favourite examples below:

Metal extendable wall light from Rockett St. George. The shade has a 12cm diameter. This vintage style light is made to be hardwired and requires a GU10 bulb.

Metal extendable wall light from Rockett St. George. The shade has a 12cm diameter. This vintage style light is made to be hardwired and requires a GU10 bulb.

This is an impressive collection of fifty 1960's factory pendants from Elemental: Antiques and Vintage Furniture. Constructed from sturdy mirror polished metal with thick glass lenses and finished with deep grey enamelled shade. These would look amazing spread uniformly across a high ceiling in a bar or restaurant.

This is an impressive collection of fifty 1960’s factory pendants from Elemental: Antiques and Vintage Furniture. Constructed from sturdy mirror polished metal with thick glass lenses and finished with deep grey enamelled shade. These would look amazing spread uniformly across a high ceiling in a bar or restaurant.

Caged industrial style work lamp by Discover Attic, Not on the High Street.com. For a touch of vintage industrial style at home, this is a modern take, on the old loft lights with modern industrial styling. Perfect placed on a side table, bookcase or hung from a nail on the wall.

Caged industrial style work lamp by Discover Attic, Not On The High Street.com. For a touch of vintage industrial style at home, this is a modern take, on the old loft lights with modern industrial styling. Perfect placed on a side table, bookcase or hung from a nail on the wall.

Bretz Industrial Pendant Light from Interior Addict. A smart contemporary re-invention of the industrial cage light, a great centrepiece above a dining room table or breakfast bar.

Bretz Industrial Pendant Light from Interior Addict. A smart contemporary re-invention of the industrial cage light, a great centrepiece above a dining room table or breakfast bar.

The Gizmo Vintage Industrial Table light from Rockett St. George is another nod to the stylings of the past. Looks great simply used on it's own or for a real statement, set in a line along a bar or counter top.

The Gizmo Vintage Industrial Table light from Rockett St. George is another nod to the stylings of the past. Looks great simply used on it’s own or for a real statement, set in a line along a bar or counter top.

The large Simmons Industrial Pendant light from Interior Addict is made from solid iron and would really add the wow factor to any space when hung in a row of 3 or 5.

The large Simmons Industrial Pendant light from Interior Addict is made from solid iron and would really add the wow factor to any space when hung in a row of 3 or 5.

A variety of repurposed and found parts came together to make this

A variety of repurposed and found parts came together to make this “fem-industrial” ceiling pendant. Designed by Mark Bell, for Omega Lighting Design, it is fully rewired and ready to hang. Includes vintage 60’s glass globe shade. Each light is always different depending on what kind of found items we have available.

This installation has been created by Omega Lighting Design, using weathered old wench hooks recycled to become beautiful industrial farmhouse pendants. Suspended in a cluster, they have real impact. Great for rustic kitchen island or bar lights. 8

This installation has been created by Omega Lighting Design, using weathered old wench hooks recycled to become beautiful industrial farmhouse pendants. Suspended in a cluster, they have real impact. Great for rustic kitchen island or bar lights. 8″ globes and 60 watt Edison bulbs included. Each hook is slightly different, but the lights can be ordered to exact hang measurements.

You can source some stunning original vintage lights such as these French Vintage Industrial lights from places such as Antiquaireonline.com and other antique dealers or from ebay.

You can source some stunning original vintage lights such as these French Vintage Industrial lights from places such as Antiquaireonline.com and other antique dealers or from ebay. There are also some great antique and vintage fairs across the UK where you can pick up some amazing pieces.

This is an image of one of the interiors of Viajante, a Retaurant & Bar in East London. The installation comprises a mix of reclaimed vintage industrial lights suspended at different heights throughout the space.

This is an image of one of the interiors of Viajante, a Retaurant & Bar in East London. The installation comprises a mix of reclaimed vintage industrial lights suspended at different heights throughout the space.

The wonderfully eclectic Cafe Kafka was inspired by two old tables that were at the establishment prior to it's renovation. Yolanda Vilalta and Helena Jauma, have created an environment that captures the essence of the neighbourhood and respects the integrity of the building’s history and structure. This funky cosmopolitan bistro with a bohemian ambience has been assembled from a collection of different chairs, fabrics, light fixtures and accessories that give it a historical 'lived in' feel.

The wonderfully eclectic Cafe Kafka was inspired by two old tables that were at the establishment prior to it’s renovation. Yolanda Vilalta and Helena Jauma, have created an environment that captures the essence of the neighbourhood and respects the integrity of the building’s history and structure. This funky cosmopolitan bistro with a bohemian ambience has been assembled from a collection of different chairs, fabrics, light fixtures and accessories that give it a historical ‘lived in’ feel.

Additional Research links:

Article on Industrial style lighting – http://remodelista.com/posts/industrial-light-mashups

Article on Cafe Kafka, Barcelona, Spain – http://yatzer.com/Cafe-KAFKA-Barcelona-Spain

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A Few of my Favourite Things: Lighting

As a creative practitioner and lover of good design, this post is really a bit of an indulgence and a chance to share some of my favourite lighting designs out there on the market. Obviously, with thousands of beautiful pieces to choose from, this is but a mere taster from the vast and varied selection out there. Please click on the links within the post to see other great designs from the likes or Artemide, Moooi, Foscarini, Flos and many more.

The Torch S6 Bunch 20 Cluster Lamp was designed by Sylvain Willenz for the design furniture and lighting manufacturer Established&Sons.

Dear Ingo designed by Ron Gilad, for Moooi in 2003. “Ron Gilad’s hybrid objects combine material with aesthetic play; they sit on the fat delicious line between the abstract and the functional.”

These sculptural floor lights are part of the Suzusan Arimatsu Shibori Luminaires collection, designed by Japanese Master Craftsmen and Design partners, Hiroshi Murase and his son Hiroyuki Murase. Using the ancient craft SHIBORI; a Japanese textile finishing technique, Suzusan has created a stunning portfolio of fabrics, accessories and luminaires that successfully combines traditional Japanese craft with modern design.

The Uto lamp, created by Lagranja Design for Foscarini, is flexible and interactive, it is ideal for use both indoors and out, it is a floor, ceiling or hook lamp that can be placed anywhere and is able to follow the individual from one room to the next, it is shatterproof and indestructible. Made of silicon rubber, it is soft to touch, innovative, playful and versatile.

Pipe, designed by Luca Nichetto, is a multifunctional lamp with a clean, linear form that is capable of producing different strengths of illumination.

Zeppelin pendant light for Flos, developed by Marcel Wanders from an original idea by Achille and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni.

The Fl/y suspension light designed by ferruccio laviani for Kartell, is designed with a transparent bubble-like shade of transparent methacrylate that comes in a full range of colours, with matching ceiling rose and adjustable cable.

Designed for Flos by Achille Castiglioni and Pier Giacomo Castiglioni in 1962, the Arco floor lamp has become a design classic and is now part of the permanent collection at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. Inspired by street lights, the white Carrara marble base and dramatic telescopic arched stem provides adjustable, directional light, while the dimmer switch creates an ambient glow.

The PLUMEN 001 is the world’s first designer low energy light bulb. The dynamic, sculptured form contrasts to the dull regular shapes of existing low energy bulbs, in an attempt to make the Plumen a centrepiece, not afterthought. The plumen is perfect for enhancing an existing light fitting or will happily hold it’s own as a contemporary piece of design. When teamed with brightly coloured flex, the plumen makes a stunning installation piece.

Aplomb is one of the latest editions to Foscarini‘s lighting portfolio. This Small hanging concrete pendant lamp is offered in three finishes, from the traditional grey of cement in its raw state, a simple white hue, and a warm clay brown. A Perfect focal point over tables, peninsulas and counters, either independently or in a cluster.

The Atman table light is Part of Catellani & Smith‘s Eco-Logic range. It is crafted using a single block of crystal with a Nickel-plated base that houses the low energy 3W LED. The Atman is available in either cool white (6000k) or warm white (3500k) LED and comes complete with a touch-tronic dimmer offering two intensities of lighting.

The new Etch Light Web designed by Tom Dixon casts an intricate angular pattern when lit, showcasing a beautiful partnership between geometry and design. An irregular pentagon is repeated 60 times to create a 65cm(approx) wide sphere, and despite the size, it remains lightweight at just over 2 pounds.

Elsewhere 600 wall/ceiling light designed by Carlotta de Bevilacqua 2010 for Artemide. This elegant light has been designed with an outer structure in stainless steel with mirror, side diffusers, Prismoptic satin polished aluminum reflector mirror, front diffuser in transparent engraved methacrylate. Two openings along two opposite sides of the outer structure provide a gentle wash of light across the wall or ceiling.

Marie Louise Lamp designed by Buro Vormkrijgers. This innovative light is constructed from sheets of acrylic, illuminated by a 14-watt fluorescent bulb along the length of the structure’s leg to emit a stylish glow. A range of colour options are available and it comes in two styles, either an intricate etched pattern or a plain transparent design.

One Line LED table light designed by Ora Ito for Artemide, 2005. Constructed from die-cast aluminum with the body in extruded aluminum with steel core and LED light. Provides excellent task lighting, with the ability to rotate the lamp body on the horizontal plane and a dimmer to control light levels.

Melange Grande Multi Pendant Chandelier light by Leitmotiv. This stunning sculptural cluster light is an ideal focal point for any space. The fitting houses 10 bulbs in total, giving out a soft glow, ideal for ambient lighting.

Lighting Research and stockists:

Established and Sonshttp://www.establishedandsons.com

Moooihttp://www.moooi.com

Ambient Directhttp://www.ambientedirect.com/en/categories/lighting

Foundry Light + Designhttp://foundryonline.co.uk

Flos (products) – http://109.69.200.28/decorative/index.aspx?lang=en&site=international&referrer=http://www.flos.com/

Foscarini – http://www.foscarini.com/prodotti.php?lang=en

Artemide – http://www.artemide.com/index.action

Mac&Mac Interiors – http://www.macandmacinteriors.co.uk/

Plumen – http://ukshop.plumen.com/collections

Present Time: Leitmotiv – http://www.presenttime.com/c-7-leitmotiv.aspx?1=1

Shoreditch Lighting – http://www.shoreditchlighting.co.uk 

Better Living Through Designhttp://www.betterlivingthroughdesign.com/category/accessories/lighting/

Design Museum London: Lighting – http://designmuseum.org/search?query=lighting&x=0&y=0

What are the different types of lighting that can be used in an Interior Lighting Scheme?

The Importance of Lighting

In addition to being a potential health and safety risk, particularly in areas such as the kitchen or a workshop, bad or ineffective lighting can be detrimental to your wellbeing. Poor lighting can lead to symptoms such as headaches, sore eyes and leave you feeling lethargic. In terms of practicality, bad lighting can create issues such as dimly lit work surfaces or kitchen counters, making it difficult to perform everyday tasks. Poorly planned lighting can create issues such as having to get out of bed to turn off the light or having to cross a darkened room to find the switch on the opposing wall to the doorway.

A successful lighting scheme is made up of several layers: natural, decorative, general, accent and task lighting. The key is to create a flexible scheme that adjusts throughout the day and suits all of the activities and functions of your spaces. You should be able to, simply and quickly, transform a room from a bright and vibrant family space one moment to a calm, soft, atmospheric glow for a romantic meal for two, the next. Thoughtful design will make your home or space feel spacious, warm and welcoming, clean and functional.

There are five basic types of lighting that work together in your home:

Natural lighting is a fantastic asset to any home, but the quality of the light can vary greatly depending on the aspect of the room and the size, shape, style of the windows, doors and openings into the space. The window treatments and furniture you choose for a space may also have a considerable impact on the amount of light within a space. Good design should take advantage of the natural light available and capture it in the most effective or appropriate way to enhance the lighting scheme within the space.

  • North facing: cool and harsh rather than direct sunlight. Artists often choose north-facing studios because the light gives truer colour rendition.
  • East facing: bright early in the morning followed by long shadows and little or no sun later in the day. Incorporate  artificial lighting to control glare and maximise the available natural light in north and east-facing rooms.
  • South facing: warm light throughout the day, although it changes depending on the day and year. The sun in the middle of the day is usually so bright that it makes things appear flat. South-facing rooms are ideal for the kitchen, main living areas and other rooms you spend a lot of time in.
  • West facing: sunlight at the hottest part of the day, which can cause glare. In the late afternoon, as with East-facing rooms, it creates long shadows and softer light.

Wakaba Restaurant, Kieko and Minoru Yoshihara, London 1987. Designed by minimalist Architect and Designer, John Pawson. Wakaba’s facade is a single curved wall of translucent, acid-etched glass: both a sign and a filter protecting the tranquility of the interior.

Barcelona Pavilion by Architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. The architect has created a building that is wrapped in floor to ceiling glass walls that flood the interior spaces with natural light and connect the interior living spaces with the spaces and landscape outdoors. The changing levels of natural light throughout the day provides a constantly shifting ambience within it’s interior spaces.

Decorative lighting provides a visual or decorative impact within a space. fairy lights, lanterns, battery operated light chains, small pebble lamps etc. can create focal points and add some sparkle to a space. Fairy lights draped across a fireplace or a cluster of small pebble lights on the floor can provide decoration and ambience for a social event or celebration, or simply to provide a soft glow for an evening in.

Decorative light installation by Northern Irish artist and designer Rachel O’Neill. This beautiful, delicate installation provides not only light, but also a focal point, decoration, texture, form and structure.

Fibre Optic Star Ceiling project by Starscape a Fibre Optic and LED Lighting Company. This project for Sphere Custom Design provides a striking, sparkling, low-level light replica of a starry night sky that provides decoration on the ceiling of a bespoke home cinema space.

Ambient lighting provides an area with overall illumination. Also known as general lighting, it radiates a comfortable level of brightness without glare, enabling you to see and move around the space safely. In some small spaces such as a bathroom or utility room, the ambient lighting also acts as the primary source of task lighting.

It can be accomplished with chandeliers, ceiling or wall-mounted fixtures, recessed or track lights and with lanterns mounted outside the building. Having a central source of ambient light in all rooms is fundamental to a good lighting plan.

A series of PEARL pendant lights, by German lighting company Schmitz-Leuchten, provides general lighting within this large Reception space. The pendant light made of natural white polyethylene can be fixed at different altitudes by an adjustable wire suspension. Ideal as a lighting solution for showrooms, halls, foyers and shopping arcades and open-plan living areas.

This open-plan living space incorporates, kitchen, dining and a lounge area within one large open space. John Cullen Lighting have created a multi-layered lighting scheme that provides natural, ambient, task and mood lighting throughout the space.

Task lighting enables you to perform specific tasks, such as reading, writing, preparing and cooking food, doing homework, working on hobbies and so on. It can be provided by recessed and track lighting, pendant lights, under-cabinet lighting, and also through the use of portable floor, table and desk lamps.

Task lighting should be free of distracting glare and shadows, however it must be bright enough to prevent eye strain.

Artemide have been at the forefront of International lighting design since it was established by Ernesto Gismondi and Sergio Mazza in 1959. In this space, the Pipe Terra lights designed by Herzog & De Meuron, 2005, provides light specifically for reading.

Accent lighting adds drama to a room by creating visual interest. As part of an interior design scheme, it is used to draw the eye to architectural features, houseplants, paintings/photographs, sculptures and other prized possessions. It can also be used to highlight the texture of materials such as a brick or stone wall, window treatments, furniture or outdoor landscaping.

To be effective, accent lighting requires as least three times as much light on the focal point as the general lighting surrounding it.

Accent lighting is usually provided by recessed and track lighting or wall-mounted picture lights.

Accent lighting designed by Italian Architect and Designer Claudio Silvestrin for the Georgio Armani store, London. The simple linear arrangement of a series of beautifully engineered square spotlights, illuminates the items on display whilst maintaining a minimal aesthetic. Form and function work beautifully together for this stunning retail display.

Lighting Fixtures, Shapes and Forms – The American Lighting Association

Light Fixtures and Fittings – BBC Homes

Lighting Controls and Dimmers – – The American Lighting Association

Research Links:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/homes/design/lighting_types.shtml#lighting_for_occasions

http://www.bbc.co.uk/homes/design/lighting_basics.shtml

http://www.americanlightingassoc.com/Lighting-Fundamentals/3-Types-of-Lighting.aspx

http://www.lightsearch.com/resources/lightguides/design.html

http://interiorzine.com/2010/06/04/decorative-lighting/

http://www.starscape.co.uk/

http://www.housetohome.co.uk/search/lighting+

http://news.archiexpo.com/press/architectural-lighting-AF.html

Inspired Lighting by Claudio Silvestrin Architects

Claudio Silvestrin was born in 1954, he studied under A. G. Fronzoni in Milan and at the Architectural Association in London. From 1986 to 1988, Silvestrin worked in partnership with John Pawson at their London studio Pawson Silvestrin Architects. In 1989 he established Claudio Silvestrin Architects in London, expanding in 2006, with an office in Milan.

Claudio Silvestrin is considered by many to be one of the masters of contemporary minimalism, and is revered by international architects and designers, such as Giorgio Armani and Terence Conran. His portfolio of clients include; Giorgio Armani, Illycaffe, Anish Kapoor, Calvin Klein, Victoria Miro, Kanye West, Cappellini, Poltrona Frau and the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo for whom he designed the museum in Turin.

His work deals with day to day objects, domestic and commercial interiors, art galleries and houses. He is best known for the serene spaces, essential forms and the simple clean lines of his architecture and interior design.

‘He is renowned worldwide for integrity, clarity of mind, inventiveness and concern for details, reflected in his architecture: austere but not extreme, contemporary yet timeless, calming but not ascetic, strong but not intimidating, elegant but not ostentatious, simple but not soulless.’ – Quote from 1+1=1 Website:  http://www.claudiosilvestringiulianasalmaso.com/partners.html

In 2002, Claudio Silvestrin co-founded 1+1=1 with partner Giuliana Salmaso. Giuliana Salmaso graduated from IUAV and trained at Claudio Silvestrin architects in London. Working closely with Claudio, Giuliana has developed her design philosophy through challenging convention. Her ambition is to contribute towards designing a better world. She is also visiting professor at the Politecnico University in Milan.

‘Through stable, quiet and serene architecture (rather than through loud and ostentatious forms) the soul gives up fighting against its earthly fate and finds peace’. – Quote by architect Claudio Silvestrin from the book ‘The non-materiality of the material – Claudio Silvestrin‘, Written by Franco Bertoni, Published by Birkhäuser Basel; 1 edition (November 1, 1999), ISBN-13: 978-3764361051.

Although Claudio Silvestrin Architects and 1+1=1 Claudio Silvestrin Giuliana Salmaso architects and planners have both produced stunning portfolio’s that include architecture, interior design, spatial planning, bespoke furniture design and lighting schemes, for this particular post, I am concentrating on the beauty and simplicity that Silvestrin achieves through his use of natural and artificial light. As you can see from the images below, the lighting breathes life and soul into the spaces and interiors he creates – the lighting schemes are integral to the functionality of both the buildings and their interiors. The lighting has evolved throughout the design process from it’s first conception and as such enhances, showcases, creates drama and forms narratives with the architectural spaces within which they operate; something of a symbiotic relationship.

I love the simple, elegant forms cast by the lights along corridors, the delicate glow that seeps from the voids where a wall invisible meets the ceiling, or the gentle glow that eminates from beneath a beautifully crafted piece of furniture or counter top. Below are just a few images that I thought I would share. For more stunning examples of lighting and projects, please click on the links within this post.

P Penthouse Montecarlo 2006. Artificial lighting project by Claudio Silvestrin Architects.

Miro House London 1988. Artificial lighting project by Claudio Silvestrin Architects

Giorgio Armani Milan 2000. Artificial lighting project by Claudio Silvestrin Architects

Barker Mill Apartment London 1992. Artificial lighting project by Claudio Silvestrin Architects

White Cube Gallery London 1993. Natural lighting project by Claudio Silvestrin Architects

Open Cloister Hombroich (subject to planning permission). Natural lighting project by Claudio Silvestrin Architects

Canal Building Loft London 2001. Natural lighting project by Claudio Silvestrin Architects

Research Links:

http://www.claudiosilvestrin.com/

http://www.claudiosilvestringiulianasalmaso.com/

http://www.cappellini.it/portal/page/portal/new/webpages/cappellini/designer/detail?p=id:81489&lang=en

http://www.wallpaper.com/architecture/book-claudio-silvestrin/5399

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claudio_Silvestrin

Interview with Claudio Silvestrin for Blueprint Magazine – http://www.blueprintmagazine.co.uk/index.php/architecture/interview-claudio-silvestrin/

Video Links and Images for Claudio Silvestrin – 

http://www.ovguide.com/claudio-silvestrin-9202a8c04000641f80000000174ea881

Ingo Maurer

Johnny B Butterfly by Ingo Maurer. Two butterflies and a dragonfly circling around a light bulb!

Ingo Maurer was born in 1932 on the Island of Reichenau, Lake Constance, Germany. Following an apprenticeship as a typographer, he studied graphic design in Munich, Germany from 1954-58. In 1960, Maurer left Germany and moved to the USA, where he worked in New York and San Francisco as a freelance graphic designer. In 1963, he moved back to Germany, and founded Design M, a company developing and manufacturing lamps after his own designs. The company was later renamed Ingo Maurer GmbH. One of his first designs, Bulb, 1966 is now featured in the design collection of the Museum of Modern Art.

In 1984 Maurer presented YaYaHo, a low-voltage wire system comprising two horizontally fixed metal ropes and a series of adjustable lighting elements with halogen bulbs, which became an instant success. In response to this success, Maurer was invited to create a series of site-specific YaYaHo installations for the exhibition “Lumieres je pense a vous” at the Pompidou Centre in Paris, the Villa Medici in Rome, and the Institut Francais d’Architecture in Paris.

In 1989 Maurer created a solo exhibition of lighting objects that were regarded bespoke design pieces, not meant for mass production. The exhibition Ingo Maurer: Lumière Hasard Réflexion, (Ingo Maurer: Light Chance Reflection) at the Cartier Foundation for Contemporary Art, in Jouy-en-Josas near Paris.

Since then his design and objects have been presented in a series of exhibitions, including the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, 1993. In 2002 the Vitra Design Museum organised Ingo Maurer – Light – Reaching for the Moon, a touring exhibition that spanned Europe and Japan. In 2007 the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, New York presented the exhibition Provoking Magic: Lighting of Ingo Maurer.

Ingo Maurer is a highly innovative designer and was among the first designers to create objects using LEDs, the first being the lighting object Bellissima Brutta in 1996. In 2001 he presented EL.E.Dee, a table lamp using LED’s. Since 2006, Maurer has also been experimenting with organic light-emitting diodes, designing two objects and a limited edition table lamp.

In addition to his manufactured lighting designs, Ingo Maurer creates both public and private lighting installations such as his light installation at Westfriedhof subway station, Munich in 1998 and a renovation and lighting concept for Muenchner Freiheit subway station, 2009. In 1999, he designed and created an installation for renowned fashion designer, Issey Miyake for a fashion show in Paris. In 2006 he created lighting objects and installations for the interior of the Atomium the Brussels. In 2011, Ingo Maurer and Allmann Sattler Wappner were selected for their lighting design inspired by the Chinese I Ching for the re-design for the underground area of the U-Bahn public transport station Marienplatz in Munich.

Among his best-known designs are the winged bulb Lucellino, 1992, Porca Miseria!, 1994, a suspension lamp made with porcelain shards.

Bellissima Brutta, LED table lamp, designed by Ingo Maurer . Image sourced from www.archiproducts.com

YaYaHo, 1984, designed by Ingo Maurer. Image sourced from cultureofdesign.wordpress.com

The LED table by Ingo Maurer, 2003. This stunning table lights up with 278 white LEDs per leaf and is available in 2-leaf and 3-leaf. Image sourced from www.trendir.com

Ingo Maurer's egg installation at Milan Design Week, 2009. Maurer explains his work; 'the egg shape, perfect and beautiful, is a recurring element in my work. in fact, there’s a direct connection to milan: the egg in piero della francesca’s montefeltro altarpiece, belonging to the pinacoteca di brera, holds a particular fascination for me. However, for me the egg had to be flawed: it is broken, and light emerges from the cracks.'
Image sourced from www.designboom.com

Ingo Maurer presented the installation "ablaze - sentimento (s)travolgente" as part of "Architettura Mutante" at Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan. The installations were on view from April 13-25, 2011. Image sourced from www.ingo-maurer.com

Silly-Kon, 2011. A pendant light complete with halogen bulb, providing perfect colour rendering and a warm light and with a transparent cable.
Image: Tom Vack, Munich. Copyright Ingo Maurer GmbH. Image sourced from www.ingo-maurer.com

ManOMan, 2011, a new suspension lamp that was first shown at Euroluce. Designed for use over large tables or spaces, this fixture is suspended from a single mounting point, and emits outstanding indirect lighting. Image sourced from www.ingo-maurer.com

Ingo Maurer's LED Wallpaper was selected as "Best of Best" among the winners of the Interior Innovation Award in 2012. Image sourced from www.ingo-maurer.com

Please follow this link www.designboom to read an interview with Ingo Maurer.

Please follow this link www.inhabitat.com to read an article about Ingo Maurer at At Salone Internazional del Mobile’s Euroluce in Milan, 2007.

Droog Design: Lighting & Products to Environmental Design Business Model

Droog Lighting Design

Droog has many facets to it’s company, some of which I have discussed further on in this blog post however, I am researching lighting at the moment and so the following images pay homage to the fabulous lighting designs created by Droog designers and collaborations. Enjoy!

Clothes hanger lamp for Droog by Hector Serrano. Image sourced from www.dezeen.com

85 Lamps for Droog by Rody Graumans. Image sourced from moderndesigninterior.com

Sticky lamp for Droog by Chris Kabel. Image sourced from www.dsgnwrld.com

Saving Grace pendant lights by Adrien Rovero for Droog. Image sourced from www.dezeen.com

Milk bottle lamp for Droog by Tejo Remy. Image sourced from blog.mr-uxn.com

Droog was co-founded and remains under the direction of curator and author Renny Ramakers. Working in collaboration with designers, clients and partners, Droog creates products, projects and events around the world. Droog has offices in Amsterdam and New York, a store in Amsterdam, and retail partners across the globe.

Droog works in close collaboration with an international network of over one hundred and fifty established and emerging designers, architects and artists on products and projects.

As described on Droog’s website, through Droog Lab , “we pioneer new design directions, tools and models that offer a unique perspective.” Droog achieves this through:

Collaboration – “We establish new collaborations between clients, designers, institutions and the public. Bringing together the technical and the creative, the old and the young, the professional and the non-professional, we pool diverse fields of knowledge and experience to pioneer new directions for design and business.”

Models – “We develop models for creating, producing and distributing design, for business strategies, and for consumer needs and ways of living. Our models pioneer new directions in design, business and consumer culture.”

Tools – “We develop tools for identity and public relations, bringing a unique perspective to business and its intersection with consumer culture. Whether it is branding or product development, our tools engage audiences in new ways and open up new markets.”

Spaces – “We create interiors, architecture and exhibitions that establish a new relationship between the brand and the public. Our spaces redefine luxury, explore the boundary between the design and non-design world, and engage users in new ways.”

Events – “We create design exhibitions, festivals and events around the world, establishing new relationships with the local community and creating new experiences inspired by the location. Our events emphasize interaction with the audience.”

UP – Sustainable Design
UP, initiated by Droog, is “an investigative economic model that aims to increase the value of dead stock through re-design.” Up is all about sustainability and acts as a clever alternative to recycling and disposal through a process of up-cycling, creative re-interpretation and re-design, in order to bring unused stock back into circulation. The principle is based on the fact that a product holds it’s highest value when it is first introduced to the market. Gradually the product depreciates in value, the longer it remains on the market and eventually it becomes dead stock – this is often disposed of, creating an additional cost, both financially and environmentally. It is at this point that Droog’s model of re-invention through design, and giving products new function or improved aesthetic instills value back into the product and places it back within the marketplace. UP was launched at the UP conference on November 3rd, 2011 along with the first collection of UP products, using re-invented stock from collaborating companies including Makro, van Gansewinkel, Vlisco and Mediq.

UP Business Model, by Droog

For more information about Droog design and their principles, there are a number of publications available to buy from their website.

For further information about Droog: A Touch of Green, Milan 2008, please also visit: http://inhabitat.com/milan-2008-droog-design-goes-green/#more-10066

Foscarini Lighting

Foscarini Decorative lighting

Foscarini Decorative lighting
Foscarini Headquarters located in an architect-designed, contemporary building, representing their corporate mission to provide cutting edge design and sales service with logistics and warehousing providing total quality control.

Information about Foscarini from the David Village Lighting website

Foscarini is a highly innovative Italian lighting company that was set up as Foscarini Spa in Murano Island, Venice in 1981. It is a company that has the product at it’s absolute core, describing themselves as “A technological and creative workshop that conceives, develops and produces not just lamps but pure emotions, in collaboration with many other designers from around the world. A company that is free, passionate, unconventional and right at the heart of the industry in which it thrives. This is Foscarini.” – Quote from Foscarini Profile PDF

Foscarini are well known for their collaborative approach to design, working with international designers, both established and emerging. Their catalogue includes over 50 models, more than 20 different materials and more than 30 designers combined to create a collection of individual lamps, each with it’s own narrative and aesthetically beautiful. Foscarini’s designer portfolio includes projects with:

Werner Aisslinger, Atelier Oï, Valerio Bottin, Changedesign, Aldo Cibic, Designwork, Tom Dixon, Rodolfo Dordoni, Patricia Urquiola + Eliana Gerotto, Odoardo Fioravanti, Jozeph Forakis, Enrico Franzolini, Giampietro Gai, Massimo Gardone, Giulio Iacchetti, Vicente Garcia Jimenez, Defne Koz, Lagranja Design, Ferruccio Laviani, Giovanni Levanti, Lievore Asociados, Jean Marie Massaud, Alessandra Matilde, Nendo, Luca Nichetto, Ludovica+Roberto Palomba, Lucidi & Pevere, Karim Rashid, Marc Sadler, Studio Baruffi & De Santi, Studio Kairos, Pio + Tito Toso, Ionna Vautrin, Urbinati Ricci + Vecchiato and Marco Zito.

Foscarini has secured it’s place as a dynamic, inventive and creative entity within the arena of lighting design. The company has gained numerous awards, including the Compasso d’Oro for Mite and Tite designed by Marc Sadler, which expanded the possibilities of research and experimentation in the field of materials and production technology.

Developing new products is at the heart of the company, however, only designs that express new ideas are chosen to put into production. While inspiration is always valued, Foscarini invests heavily in the development phase, sometimes taking years of progressive research to analyze materials, shapes, processes and operation that often evolves into a design that is drastically different from the initial concept. Foscarini believes that the combination of innovation and extensive development enables their designs to thrive beyond trends and become true classics.

Foscarini Product Timeline:

1990 Folio, Lumiere 1992 Orbital 1993 Bit, Havana, Quadro 1994 Circus 1995 Lightweight 1996 Dolmen, Double, Dress, Esa 1998 Cross, Qua, Shape, Totem 2000 Bubble, Cocò, Mite, Tite, Supernova, 2001 Affix, Lite, Manta, Tutù 2002 Blob 2003 Bague, Ellepi, Kite, O-space, Yet 2004 Gea, Giga-Lite, Mega-Kite 2005 Big Bang, Caboche, Uto 2006 Twiggy 2007 Allegro, Easy, Empire, Fields, Gregg, New Buds, See you, Tosca, Wagashi 2008 Tress, Tropico 2009 Flap, Fly-Fly, Allegretto, Le Soleil, Lumiere XXL, Wave 2010 Aplomb, Bahia, Tua, Troag, Binic, LumiereXXS

Orbital floor light, designed by Ferruccio Laviani, 1992 for Foscarini

Lightweight pendant light, designed by Tom Dixon, 1995 for Foscarini

Lite table light, designed by Marc Sadler, 2000 for Foscarini

Caboche floor lights, designed by Patricia Urquiola and Eliana Gerotto, 2005 for Foscarini

Big Bang pendant light, designed by Enrico Franzolini and Vicente Garcia Jimenez, 2005 for Foscarini

Allegro pendant light, designed by Atelier Oï, 2007 for Foscarini

Binic table light, designed by Ionna Vautrin, 2010 for Foscarini

Anisha table light, designed by Lievore Asociados, 2011 for Foscarini

Jamaica pendant light, designed by Marc Sadler, 2012 for Foscarini

Foscarini contributes to disseminating and supporting design culture: from the inclusion of its designs at the Art and Architecture Biennale in Venice, the collection of New York’s MoMA, the Milan Triennial Exhibition and many other international museums.

On-going dialogue with interior designers and architects plays a vital part of Foscarini’s communication system. Foscarini has always emphasized the personalisation of space, Through the use of multiple models and intriguing interactive installations, Foscarini emphasises the ability to personalise spaces and create an emotive response. Through a series of international exhibitions, Foscarini offers different ways to read their collection. An example of this is Fiber Evolution, an eclectic, emotional, luminous display, put together with Marc Sadler, which during 2008 was seen in six major design capitals in Europe and the United States. Also, In 2009, a series of events featuring Tropico; a project developed in collaboration with Giulio Iacchetti; then in 2010, the installation-event Foscarini Evolution, Frankfurt emphasised the collection’s technical and materials’ interpretation.

In 2009 Foscarini established a licensing agreement with Diesel, that culminated in the development and distribution of their Lighting collection. The five-year licence paved the way for diversification through a collection, designed by Diesel, that enabled Foscarini to tap into a younger market.

Installation of Lite, designed by Marc Sadler for Fiber Evolution, Centro commerciale, in Romania

Installation of Tress lights, designed by Marc Sadler for the Foscarini Evolution - Langenthal, Svizzera

Installation of Tropico pendant lights, designed by Giulio Iacchetti for the Applied Arts Museum, Frankfurt, Germany

Foscarini Timeline

1981 Foscarini Spa set up on Murano Island (Venice).

1983 First collection of lamps designed by Carlo Urbinati and Alessandro Vecchiato.

1985 First collection in collaboration with external designers: Wassily off-the-wall, by Adam Tihany and Joseph Mancini.

1988 Carlo Urbinati and Alessandro Vecchiato become the company owners and managers.

1990 Rodolfo Dordoni designs Lumiere, Foscarini’s first major success.

1992 orbital, Ferruccio Laviani’s debut lamp, is the first Foscarini lamp made of industrial glass.

1993 Havana, designed by Jozeph Forakis, is the first Foscarini lamp made of a material other than glass, namely polyethylene.

1994 Foscarini moves from Murano Island to Marcon, on Venetian terra firma.

1996 The company is among the first in the industry to receive UNI EN ISO 9001 quality system certification.

2000 The Mite and Tite, lamps developed in conjunction with Marc Sadler are launched. The same year, Foscarini launches its first corporate identity communication project.

2001 Foscarini and Marc Sadler, thanks to the Mite and Tite lamps, are awarded the Compasso d’Oro for “the bold technological innovation”.

2002 Lux magazine, Foscarini’s first publishing experience, starts off.

2003 The new Foscarini facility is inaugurated in Marcon (Venice).

2005 Caboche, designed by Patricia Urquiola and Eliana Gerotto, inaugurates a successful season for Foscarini, with models such as Twiggy; Marc Sadler, 2006, Gregg 2007; L+R Palomba, 2007, Tress; Marc Sadler, 2008, Le Soleil Vicente; Garcia Jimenez, 2009.
These products can truly express their innovative and design culture contents, owing also to the company’s accrued experience in all fields: from technology, to communication, to logistics.

2008 Foscarini becomes the official sponsor of the Venice Biennale Exhibition.

2009 Foscarini and Diesel sign a licensing deal, as part of the “Home Collection” furniture and lifestyle project. This partnership gives Foscarini the opportunity to liaise with a new target and explore new lifestyles and furnishing trends, through a collection conceived by Diesel for its own target: “Successful Living from Diesel with Foscarini”.

2010 Foscarini presents a new publishing adventure, mid way between a book and a magazine, called INVENTARIO– Everything is a project.


Research for text from the following websites: Architonic: Foscarini profile, Foscarini and from the Foscarini Profile PDF
To purchase Foscarini Lighting, visit Mac&Mac Interiors or Made in Design, or  David Village Lighting